Climate Change in the News: What’s Interesting This Week

Written by Stephanie Hedean on . Posted in Learn, The Wonk Room

In the News is a Planet Change selection of the latest news on climate change, nature, our environment and the impacts of a changing planet. Here’s what we found interesting this week. What climate related news piqued your interest this week? Comment to share.

Saving Seagrass Could Bury More Carbon
Seagrass meadows can store up to twice as much carbon as the world’s temperate and tropical forests. This makes seagrasses a vital part of the solution to climate change, according to a new international study, published this week in the journal Nature Geoscience. This is the first global analysis of carbon stored in seagrasses and demonstrates that coastal seagrass beds can store up to 83,000 metric tons of carbon per square kilometer, mostly in the soils below them. For comparison, a typical terrestrial forest stores around 30,000 metric tons per square kilometer, most of which is in the form of wood. (Futurity)

Climate Change Led to Collapse of Ancient Indus Civilization, Study Finds
A new study combining the latest archaeological evidence with state-of-the-art geoscience technologies provides evidence that climate change was a key ingredient in the collapse of the great Indus or Harappan Civilization almost 4000 years ago. The study also resolves a long-standing debate over the source and fate of the Sarasvati, the sacred river of Hindu mythology. (Science Daily)

Can Market Forces Really Be Used to Address Climate Change?
Virtually all aspects of economic activity — individual consumption, business investment, and government spending — affect greenhouse gas emissions and, therefore, the global climate. In essence, an effective climate change policy must change the nature of decisions regarding these activities in order to promote more efficient generation and use of energy, lower carbon-intensity of energy, and a more carbon-lean economy. (Huffington Post)
Related: Using the Market to Address Climate Change: Insights from Theory & Experience

Public Attitudes On Climate Change Unrelated to Understanding
Are members of the public divided about climate change because they don’t understand the science behind it? If Americans knew more basic science and were more proficient in technical reasoning, would public consensus match scientific consensus? A study just published online in the journal Nature Climate Change suggests that the answer to both questions is no. Indeed, as members of the public become more science literate, individuals belonging to opposing cultural groups become even more divided on the risks that climate change poses. (Science Daily)

Expedition Company Cancels 2012 Everest Trip, Citing Unstable Ice Due to Warmer Temperatures
Himalayan Experience, a leading Everest climbing operation, announced that they would pull their team off Everest, citing unprecedented temperatures that made climbing too dangerous. Heeding advice from experienced Sherpas worried about the warmth, they decided to cancel the 2012 expedition because of unstable ice. (Think Progress)
Related: Climate Change May Make Mount Everest Unclimbable. As the Earth warms, the top of Everest is becoming more dangerous. (Discovery)

 

In the News is a Planet Change selection of the latest news on climate change, nature, our environment and the impacts of a changing planet. Here’s what we found interesting this week. What climate related news piqued your interest this week? Comment to share.

Stephanie Hedean is a Strategic Marketing and Communications Consultant and a Volunteer at The Nature Conservancy.

Credits: Flickr users wildsingapore (seagrass) and ExpeditionMedicine (Mount Everest) under a Creative Commons license; and, iLiviu Giosan, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Stefan Constantinescu, University of Bucharest; James P.M. Syvitski, University of Colorado (map). 

 

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About Planet Change

Planet Change is a Nature Conservancy blog site designed to share stories about actions the Conservancy and others around the world are taking to fight carbon pollution and the impacts of climate change, and to help people feel the connections between climate change and their daily lives and understand actions they can take.

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