What’s Your Favorite Book or Resource on Climate Change?

Written by David Connell on . Posted in Act

Last week, twitter user @theecoist posted the above question to twitter and it really made me think about what I would pass on. But it also got me thinking: What other resources are out there to get people inspired, or educated about climate change?

So I pose the question here: What book, website, short film, magazine article, essay, or photo would you pass on to “engage an open-minded, but unconcerned person” about the consequences of climate change?

We’d love to hear what you have to say, so please leave your responses and links in the comment section below.

As for my response to theecoist, I recommended  The Creation, by E.O. Wilson and Bill McKibben’s The End of Nature.

I’d also reccomend Coal River, by Michael Shnayerson. Although it’s not specifically about the climate change crisis it does provide an eye-opening look at the devestating consequences behind cheap non-renewable energy. If you read this book, you’ll likely never look at a light switch in the same way again.

Web resources I’d recommend include Climate Progress and anything written by Grist’s David Roberts.

Post by: Dave Connell, The Nature Conservancy

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Comments (15)

  • Paul Mackie

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    Check out Heidi Cullen’s The Weather of the Future. It looks at what several cities around the world will look like under various average-temperature increases. Stuff that government and city and regional planners need to prepare us all for.

    Also, any environment journalism from Rolling Stone lately has been tremendous in an age of dwindling mainstream media science and environmental reportage.

    Reply

  • Kim

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    Mother Earth News

    Reply

  • Rita Leid

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    I guess either “Planet Earth” or the one called “Earth”. Generally speaking, just about anything from the OKCZOO, bc their books are really concentrating on this subject lately.

    Reply

  • keith Farnish

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    An author once said to be, if you want the perfect book, write it yourself. So I did. Whether it’s perfect is another matter, but it’s called “Time’s Up!” and lots of people like it, so that’s fine for me :-)

    Reply

  • BigJoe @4e4_network

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    Ten Technologies to fix Climate and Energy , by Chris Goodall. Can’t recommend it too highly – rounded , unbiased, well written

    Reply

  • Christine Petersen

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    To introduce children and young adults to the topic of climate change, I recommend Lynne Cherry and Gary Braasch’s book, How We Know What We Know About Our Changing Climate. As another resource, I’ve just published a book called Earth’s Changing Climate, one of five titles in a series on environmental risks. The series is intended for students in grades 7-12, but is appropriate for general audiences just beginning to explore the history and science of climate change.

    Reply

  • Judy Harper

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    “Hot, Flat & Crowded” by Thomas L. Friedman

    Reply

  • deephil11

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    “The Fate of Nature–Rediscovering Our Ability to Rescue the Earth” by Charles Wohlforth. Charmingly written, honest about our earth’s predicament (not only concerning global warming but other mistakes humans have made) and most importantly, HOPEFUL that we and those after us can and will be able to make a difference if we band together.

    Reply

  • Sharon from Louisiana

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    I would recommend this book or film: An Inconvenient Truth, by Al Gore. I was very moved and stirred to action by his movie in the theatres. It showed me a lot of important information that I didn’t know about before, in a way that was easy to understand and very compelling. Because of this, I have been inspired to do whatever I can to help stop climate change.

    I also recommend the wonderful documentaries about Climate Change on cable TV: on the National Geographic channel, the Discovery channel. and the Science channel. All of these stations have presented very educational films that provide excellent information and interviews with experts. I am very glad to see that all of these stations have provided this information to educate their viewers.

    Reply

  • Gerard Aldridge

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    To “engage an open-minded, but unconcerned person” about the consequences of climate change, I would recommend Eaarth by Bill McKibben.

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  • Peter Kobel

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    First, Dave, let me say that if anything I tweet inspires action or discussion, I am totally thrilled. I’m really happy that you set up this forum for further discussion. There are a lot of really good suggestions here, and there are a lot of amazing resources available for learning more about the climate crisis.

    I guess I am thinking about books, movies, tv shows, websites, etc., that are not only persuasive but that convey a sense of urgency about global warming. I read in the NYTimes the other day that, according to a Pew Poll, “48 percent of people in Midwest agree with the statement that there is no ‘solid evidence that the average temperature on earth has been getting warmer.’” Okay, I have to say I think there are a lot of willfully ignorant people out there. The world has gotten hotter. That’s not a theory.

    But there are people who may think, “Yeah, global warming’s happening, but I have a lot of other things to worry about.” Or, “I think it’s certainly possible that climate change is happening, but why should I care that much?” Galvanizing books might actually influence people like that. On the other hand, you don’t want to scare people into complete inaction. “Well, it’s hopeless then.” I’m afraid James Lovelock, much as I admire him as a writer, does that in “The Revenge of Gaia.”

    My choice would probably be Mark Lynas’s “Six Degrees: Our Future on a Hotter Planet.” It
    is clear, persuasive, compelling, disturbing. It walks the reader through just what difference a degree makes. We may not be able to convince everyone, but I think we can get some people off the fence. Cheers! Peter

    Reply

  • Jessie

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    Blessed Unrest by Paul Hawken.

    An undeniably powerful read.

    Reply

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